Dissuading Clients from WYSIWYG Interfaces

Microsoft and Apple have a lot to answer for. Yes, Xerox PARC created Bravo, seen as the first WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) interface, but Microsoft and Apple made WYSIWYG the expected interface putting content into a computer. What we called “word processors” were actually desktop publishers, giving users the ability to see on the screen something very similar to what would come out on the printer.

That user expectation crept into the world of web designers with HotDog, WYSIWYG content management systems (CMS) and phrases like “above the fold”.

At the time none of us were thinking about screens as their own medium. WYSIWYG refers to paper. “Above the fold” refers to paper. Websites have nothing to do with paper and WYSIWYG should have no place in creating websites.
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Presenting design like your life depends on it: The Melbourne Edition featuring Mike Monteiro.

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Can’t fly to San Francisco for one of Mule Design’s highly sought-after workshops? Well we’re bringing one to you, Melbourne.

Our dear friends at Mule Design Studio in San Francisco have been doing some brilliant and engaging work in the past few years — above and beyond the excellent work they do for their clients.

Starting with Mike Monteiro’s “Fuck You, Pay Me” talk at Creative Mornings, through stirring and career-shifting books and talks by both Erika Hall and Mike Monteiro, they’ve been sounding a clarion that says “we can do this much better”. And people have been listening.

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Mike Monteiro of Mule Design, who will be facilitating a workshop on presentation skills at Floate on 28 January 2016.

But nobody from Mule had ever come to Melbourne, despite our constant encouragement. But we at Floate kept persisting (hassling, really)and now we are extremely pleased be hosting a Mule workshop by Mike Monteiro “Presenting design like your life depends on it” on January 28.

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Generalists and Specialists

Over at Dear Design Student today, Ross has a piece on the value of both specialists and generalists.

Generalists and specialists each approach the world from opposing viewpoints. Specialists often think of generalists as focus-free dilettantes, while generalists can’t think of anything more boring than going through a career with a single area of interest.

Pop over and have a look.

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Dear Design Student, we’re here to help.

Design can be a difficult job to get a hang of. There are no apprenticeships, hardly any mentors, and people guard their experience jealously because it’s a competitive advantage.

Now there’s Dear Design Student, a new publication featuring working designers (including yours truly) who take the time to answer the questions that have been on your mind. The writing team includes Erika Hall, Jennifer Daniel, Dan Mall, Mike Monteiro, and Liam Campbell — all very talented people with a wealth of experience to share.

If you’ve got questions about the business and practice of design, head on over and ask a question.

 

Building Sustainable User Personas

We’ve done a lot of work over the last 12 months for sporting codes, energy companies and banks. (Maybe plural is overselling it. It was one of each.)

As part of that we built user personas.

Creating user personas is hard work but totally worthwhile. They give us a sense of who it is we’re really designing for: an audience to target. They help us ask questions like: “Is Jamie interested in getting the latest scores while at his desk?” and “How important is it that Sonja see an incident report immediately.”

The personas help us make the myriad decisions that we might not otherwise be equipped to make. They boost our empathy.

But there’s a hole that clients and colleagues often fall into when it comes time to create personas. Read more